Use Caution with Rechargable Batteries & Detectors!

Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 1 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
05-19-2013, 02:53 PM
Post: #1
Lightbulb Use Caution with Rechargable Batteries & Detectors!
(This post was last modified: 05-19-2013 02:54 PM by NjNyDigger.)
Quote this message in a reply
Like many other detectorists, I recently switched to using rechargable batteries, versus constantly replacing my Minelab Safari with expensive name brand batts, and...

The experience was NOT good. I bought a set of Pearstone batts from an online vendor, along with the wall-mounted charger. Fired them up & used them on a few hunts with no problems. Then...

After a couple of weeks, my Safari started shutting down, making weird noises & the batts would drain fairly quickly. I didn't think it was the rechargables, since they worked fine in the beginning, however, at my buddies urging, I decided to replace them with the regular name brand batteries I was using previously. And...

Since then, no issues whatsoever Happy I'm strictly sticking with Energizers & Duracells from here on out. Metal detectors are sophisticated, powerful electronic devices. They require a lot of 'juice' to run...and run properly. Consider buying the name brand batteries just another (fairly expensive) necessity to hunt in total peace of mind.

Just curious if anyone actually else uses rechargables for their detector, and what their experience has been?

NjNyDigger, proud to be a member of Treasure Classifieds Forum since 2013.

[Image: image.jpg]
Find all posts by this user
05-20-2013, 12:13 AM
Post: #2
RE: Use Caution with Rechargable Batteries & Detectors!
Quote this message in a reply
Most, but not all, rechargeable batteries are actually less than stated voltage, for example, the 1.5 volt battery is really 1.2. With 8 batteries in series, instead of 12 volts, available voltage is only 9.6. The Safari probably works on 8-8.4 volts, so it doesn't take long for the 9.6v to drain to a voltage that will not run the detector. I had a Nautilus DMC IIB that had 4 - 9 volt batteries and I bought the best rechargeables available only to learn that they would not supply the 8.4 volts available. Best to all, Richard

RichardnTn, proud to be a member of Treasure Classifieds Forum since May 2013.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
05-20-2013, 06:17 PM
Post: #3
RE: Use Caution with Rechargable Batteries & Detectors!
Quote this message in a reply
(05-20-2013 12:13 AM)RichardnTn Wrote:  Most, but not all, rechargeable batteries are actually less than stated voltage, for example, the 1.5 volt battery is really 1.2. With 8 batteries in series, instead of 12 volts, available voltage is only 9.6. The Safari probably works on 8-8.4 volts, so it doesn't take long for the 9.6v to drain to a voltage that will not run the detector. I had a Nautilus DMC IIB that had 4 - 9 volt batteries and I bought the best rechargeables available only to learn that they would not supply the 8.4 volts available. Best to all, Richard

Never knew that, Rich. That would surely explain the weird occurances with the machine. Consider my experience a valuable lesson learned Idea

NjNyDigger, proud to be a member of Treasure Classifieds Forum since 2013.

[Image: image.jpg]
Find all posts by this user
07-13-2013, 12:58 PM
Post: #4
RE: Use Caution with Rechargable Batteries & Detectors!
Quote this message in a reply
(05-20-2013 12:13 AM)RichardnTn Wrote:  Most, but not all, rechargeable batteries are actually less than stated voltage,  for example, the 1.5 volt battery is really 1.2.  With 8 batteries in series, instead of 12 volts, available voltage is only 9.6.  The Safari probably works on 8-8.4 volts, so it doesn't take long for the 9.6v  to drain to a voltage that will not run the detector.  I had a Nautilus DMC IIB that had 4 - 9 volt batteries and I bought the best rechargeables available only to learn that they would not supply the 8.4 volts available. Best to all, Richard

Richard is spot on about the majority of all rechargeable batteries on the market and Joe I hate you had a bad experience using them. But I want to tell you about some batteries I found by pure chance in a closeout store called Big Lots. These batteries are manufactured by a company called PowerGenix and are named NiZn batteries. They are currently producing the second generation of these batteries and they are the absolute best rechargeable on the market. They are rated at 1.6 volt and after 3 years of heavy use I have had only 2 fail out of 24. When I say heavy use I do mean heavy plus I am not one to watch the clock when recharging them. Many times they have been left in the charger for a day or longer. In actuality these batteries usually have an output of between 1.6 and 1.7 volts. They are a new composition of  Nickle and Zinc and other alloy metals and the company is producing other batteries for electric vehicles and other platforms. I have hunted every Big Lots within 100 miles of my home searching for these and I have now struck out. They are available on Ebay and a few other places. I can get a good 10 - 12 hours of hunting out of 1 charge with either my DFX or V3i and even then they will still have about 10.3 volts showing on the machine. I always try to recharge them at this point and they do not have the infamous memory problem. Having 3 full sets allows me to rotate them so I am not constantly using the same battery pack and that always helps. Another thing I do and this may seem crazy to some but I also rotate the order of the batteries when I put them into the holder. The first couple and the last couple of batteries always seem to receive the most wear. I base this upon my checking the voltages on batteries I have pulled from battery packs that have stopped or lost a large amount of their capacity to hold charge. If you really want to save some money and get good performance try these batteries. I believe Amazon sells them also.  http://powergenix.com/

Coinhunter, proud to be a member of Treasure Classifieds Forum since Jun 2013.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
07-13-2013, 01:45 PM
Post: #5
RE: Use Caution with Rechargable Batteries & Detectors!
Quote this message in a reply
(07-13-2013 12:58 PM)Coinhunter Wrote:  
(05-20-2013 12:13 AM)RichardnTn Wrote:  Most, but not all, rechargeable batteries are actually less than stated voltage,  for example, the 1.5 volt battery is really 1.2.  With 8 batteries in series, instead of 12 volts, available voltage is only 9.6.  The Safari probably works on 8-8.4 volts, so it doesn't take long for the 9.6v  to drain to a voltage that will not run the detector.  I had a Nautilus DMC IIB that had 4 - 9 volt batteries and I bought the best rechargeables available only to learn that they would not supply the 8.4 volts available. Best to all, Richard

Richard is spot on about the majority of all rechargeable batteries on the market and Joe I hate you had a bad experience using them. But I want to tell you about some batteries I found by pure chance in a closeout store called Big Lots. These batteries are manufactured by a company called PowerGenix and are named NiZn batteries. They are currently producing the second generation of these batteries and they are the absolute best rechargeable on the market. They are rated at 1.6 volt and after 3 years of heavy use I have had only 2 fail out of 24. When I say heavy use I do mean heavy plus I am not one to watch the clock when recharging them. Many times they have been left in the charger for a day or longer. In actuality these batteries usually have an output of between 1.6 and 1.7 volts. They are a new composition of  Nickle and Zinc and other alloy metals and the company is producing other batteries for electric vehicles and other platforms. I have hunted every Big Lots within 100 miles of my home searching for these and I have now struck out. They are available on Ebay and a few other places. I can get a good 10 - 12 hours of hunting out of 1 charge with either my DFX or V3i and even then they will still have about 10.3 volts showing on the machine. I always try to recharge them at this point and they do not have the infamous memory problem. Having 3 full sets allows me to rotate them so I am not constantly using the same battery pack and that always helps. Another thing I do and this may seem crazy to some but I also rotate the order of the batteries when I put them into the holder. The first couple and the last couple of batteries always seem to receive the most wear. I base this upon my checking the voltages on batteries I have pulled from battery packs that have stopped or lost a large amount of their capacity to hold charge. If you really want to save some money and get good performance try these batteries. I believe Amazon sells them also.  http://powergenix.com/

   Cool! Just might check those out Happy

NjNyDigger, proud to be a member of Treasure Classifieds Forum since 2013.

[Image: image.jpg]
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
07-13-2013, 06:23 PM
Post: #6
RE: Use Caution with Rechargable Batteries & Detectors!
Quote this message in a reply
I have always used the rechargeable battery pack that came with the Explorers without any issues.  Used a couple packs for 6-7 years.  The life shortened over time but usually would always get at least 6-7 hours of them even after hundred and hundred of uses.  I rarely used the alkaline pack.

Joe, didn't you get a Minelab rechargeable pack with your Safari?
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
07-13-2013, 06:31 PM
Post: #7
RE: Use Caution with Rechargable Batteries & Detectors!
Quote this message in a reply
(07-13-2013 06:23 PM)Ron (CA) Wrote:  I have always used the rechargeable battery pack that came with the Explorers without any issues.  Used a couple packs for 6-7 years.  The life shortened over time but usually would always get at least 6-7 hours of them even after hundred and hundred of uses.  I rarely used the alkaline pack.

Joe, didn't you get a Minelab rechargeable pack with your Safari?

   No, Ron, just the standard battery pack. It works fine, but, having to buy new batts every 2 or 3 hunts adds up. I tried the Pearstones, as I mentioned in my OP above, however, after about a month, had numerous problems.

I'm probably going to spring for the rechargable pack soon, though. It'll save me $$$ in the long run.

NjNyDigger, proud to be a member of Treasure Classifieds Forum since 2013.

[Image: image.jpg]
Find all posts by this user
08-05-2013, 05:51 PM
Post: #8
RE: Use Caution with Rechargable Batteries & Detectors!
Quote this message in a reply
I've triied rechargeables from Energizer and they work ok.
The ones you get from Harbor Freight suck.
The eneloop batteries are terrific but pricey. Long term I'm sure they pay for themselves. In my e-trac the eneloops run at least as long as the rechrg pack that comes with it. Amazon is good source for them on-line and Costco occasionally has a blister pack with the charger and some other items which isn't a bad way to go either. Minelabs are definitely battery hogs --no doubt about that. The best feature about the 75ltd is the battery life--I get my hair cut more often than changing batteries in it.

Dusty, proud to be a member of Treasure Classifieds Forum since Aug 2013.
Find all posts by this user
09-19-2013, 03:39 PM
Post: #9
RE: Use Caution with Rechargable Batteries & Detectors!
Quote this message in a reply
Well, lets do a little Battery 101
Batteries are composed of two elements with an electrolyte in the form of a paste that are encased. This is actually a primary cell and a combination of them is called a battery. But terminology changes over time and the actual cells are sometimes referred to as "batteries".
Now, the type of elements use govern the output voltage. Carbon/zinc is in the common battery and puts out a nominal 1.5V.  Fresh batteries may read 1.7V without a load on them. The nickle/cadmium, a rechargeable cell is 1.2V,  Lithium is combined with with different other elements to come up with different voltages. The Lithium combinations hold there charge on the shelf the longest. The ones in my drill will hold there charge for months on the shelf. The Nickle/cadmium and the NiMI typs self discharge rapidly.  The newest seems to be combinations of Zinc with other elements. I have not tried them, but have heard only good reports.
Hay, I am still using the copper tops, I pick up the big packs at BJ's.
I hope you got a charge out of this!   Frank...
PS: No I am not a chemist, I spent 32 years in electronics.


Attached File(s)
.jpg  1379619570_Chube-blk-500.jpg (Size: 265.71 KB / Downloads: 41)

Frankn, proud to be a member of Treasure Classifieds Forum since Aug 2013.
Find all posts by this user
11-07-2014, 09:33 AM
Post: #10
RE: Use Caution with Rechargable Batteries & Detectors!
Quote this message in a reply
Hello all ok I have tried powergenix mnxn rechargables and had the same issue with my etrac.  They were actually 1.65 v fully charged.   Since then I have spoken with many engineers. Seems they pointed me in the right direction. I was told to try duracell rechargeable lion core . Found them at wally world 10.88$.  4 pack.  OK the results 6 months later still perfect these things last. They charge in my smart charger fairly quickly and give me an honest 25 hrs detecting time!  Just thought I would pass this info on enloop. I also trident they don't even come close! HH tdd

dirt diggler, proud to be a member of Treasure Classifieds Forum since Jul 2013.
Post Reply 


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread: Author Replies: Views: Last Post
  Discovery Treasure Baron Metal Detectors Sven TreasureLinx 20 2,017 03-31-2017 03:13 PM
Last Post: dgerst
  Cool Read - PI Landmine Detectors NjNyDigger 11 889 01-23-2015 09:50 AM
Last Post: PittsburghWill
  AKA Russian detectors anyone use one t dirt diggler 22 5,449 12-20-2014 07:11 PM
Last Post: Sven TreasureLinx
  What are the best 9 volt rechargeable batteries you guys have used? khouse 4 548 06-25-2014 09:49 PM
Last Post: Ohio Dirt Fisher



User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)