Your Treasure Library

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10-27-2016, 09:20 AM
Post: #1
Your Treasure Library
(This post was last modified: 10-27-2016 09:21 AM by NjNyDigger.)
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Obviously, we're all treasure hounds, and I'm sure that's indicated in our choice of reading materials.

Aside from the metal detecting magazines, what treasure hunting books do you have in your library? Or, what is a few of the best books you've ever read about our hobby, that you'd recommend?

I've ready many over the years, but, by far, the two best (which I still own) are "Metal Detecting Previously Hunted Sites" by Vincent C. Pascucci, and "Water Hunting: Secrets of the Pros" by Clive Clynick. Yes, there's a lot of obvious stuff in them, things which we may already know (true of any book), but both are chock full of useful nuggets that can help your productivity significantly in the field. C. Clynick in particular has a bunch of books, and, for the most part, I find them to be pretty informative.

The one regret I do have, is not reading enough of Karl Von Muller's stuff. I went through an old ratty copy of a book or two of his years ago, and I was fascinated. But his stuff tends to be VERY expensive, especially the first or second editions, which tend to be the best, as the later editions were heavily edited.

The thing about Karl Von Muller though is, most of his work isn't metal detecting centric. Meaning, while he does talk some about it, overall, he tends to write about the larger treasure hunting pastime. He talks a lot about research, mindset, how to live frugally to enjoy the hobby more, places to find hidden cash, etc. It is really entertaining stuff, and quite informative often times, especially due to his easy writing style.

I never got into the treasure tales books much. All of those things featuring "leads" on buried/sunken treasure, hidden caches, etc., as, that is so far removed from everyday metal detecting, it's like apples versus oranges. Also, I believe most of those stories to be false, or severely inaccurate, and even if the treasure DID exist, it was probably already found. I'm sure there are indeed many hidden treasures still out there, but finding them with the use of just a metal detector, plus all of the legwork & expense involved, would be quite an undertaking for the average person.

Joe


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10-27-2016, 11:19 AM
Post: #2
RE: Your Treasure Library
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Boy Howdy! It is amazing to me how often coincidence reveals itself. With the recent surge in activity here on TC I felt a few topical questions in "Lounge" or "Breakroom" might serve to keep the discussions flowing, and as I sat down to suggest a couple of new threads, the first thing I see is this juicy new post from Joe. So I'll save mine for later and hope this one turns out as good as other recent ones. I think it will.

Since I'm newly back into detecting, and in a limited way at that, I don't have a library of any size yet. I do have 2 books recently received from a friend I've yet to meet (Terry's "The Search for  Treasure" and Clynick's "Water Hunting" -which Joe just mentioned). Both of them already devoured.  But back when I was younger I had just about every copy of the treasure magazines, and I salivated over the stories of fantastic finds and dreamed of getting a detector so that I could get in on the game. I would go to our local library, just a small two room building in those days, and read books about treasure. Most of those were fiction, but there were a few dealing with real discoveries. And of course, there were the National Geographics-the ultimate treasure magazine. I can't begin to recall how many hours I spent pouring over those, looking at gold and silver coins and relics from tombs in Egypt, South America, and Mexico. To this day I hit the thrift stores getting Geographics with articles related to treasure. Some of the best Geos in my opinion dealt with the search for Spanish wrecks. I can still picture in my mind the photos of Teddy Tucker bringing up silver coins and gold chains from the waters off Florida, and later Mel Fisher hauling in the Atocha hoard. I guess it's human nature to marvel at the thought of treasure, but it really hit me hard. Sometimes I wish that I had possessed enough of the adventurer spirit to pack up everything and head off to Florida and sign on with Tucker or Fisher. Just the chance to have seen and handled some of those precious relics would have made it all worthwhile

Somewhat in that line I have Graham Hancock's book "Underworld" dealing with the possibility of vast archeological treasures under the world's oceans. A very good read. Since I consider crystals, fossils, and artifacts treasure of a sort, my shelves are filled with picture and scholarly books on those subjects. Wish I could be more detecting specific here but I simply don't have those type books right now, but I do have the internet which allows me to go all over the world in search of detecting and treasure related articles.

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10-27-2016, 11:50 AM
Post: #3
RE: Your Treasure Library
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(10-27-2016 11:19 AM)shadeseeker Wrote:  Boy Howdy! It is amazing to me how often coincidence reveals itself. With the recent surge in activity here on TC I felt a few topical questions in "Lounge" or "Breakroom" might serve to keep the discussions flowing, and as I sat down to suggest a couple of new threads, the first thing I see is this juicy new post from Joe. So I'll save mine for later and hope this one turns out as good as other recent ones. I think it will.

Since I'm newly back into detecting, and in a limited way at that, I don't have a library of any size yet. I do have 2 books recently received from a friend I've yet to meet (Terry's "The Search for  Treasure" and Clynick's "Water Hunting" -which Joe just mentioned). Both of them already devoured.  But back when I was younger I had just about every copy of the treasure magazines, and I salivated over the stories of fantastic finds and dreamed of getting a detector so that I could get in on the game. I would go to our local library, just a small two room building in those days, and read books about treasure. Most of those were fiction, but there were a few dealing with real discoveries. And of course, there were the National Geographics-the ultimate treasure magazine. I can't begin to recall how many hours I spent pouring over those, looking at gold and silver coins and relics from tombs in Egypt, South America, and Mexico. To this day I hit the thrift stores getting Geographics with articles related to treasure. Some of the best Geos in my opinion dealt with the search for Spanish wrecks. I can still picture in my mind the photos of Teddy Tucker bringing up silver coins and gold chains from the waters off Florida, and later Mel Fisher hauling in the Atocha hoard. I guess it's human nature to marvel at the thought of treasure, but it really hit me hard. Sometimes I wish that I had possessed enough of the adventurer spirit to pack up everything and head off to Florida and sign on with Tucker or Fisher. Just the chance to have seen and handled some of those precious relics would have made it all worthwhile

Somewhat in that line I have Graham Hancock's book "Underworld" dealing with the possibility of vast archeological treasures under the world's oceans. A very good read. Since I consider crystals, fossils, and artifacts treasure of a sort, my shelves are filled with picture and scholarly books on those subjects. Wish I could be more detecting specific here but I simply don't have those type books right now, but I do have the internet which allows me to go all over the world in search of detecting and treasure related articles.

"Underworld" sounds like a good read, I'm gonna check it out, Shade.

I too love the sunken treasure stuff, but just for inspiration and entertainment, as I seriously doubt I'm ever going to be diving on charters looking for lost hordes of silver & gold. Like you though, when I read about someone like Mel Fisher for example, it just reinforces further into my mind that there IS indeed treasure out there, we just have to put forth the effort & determination to find it.

You should consider sending your articles in to a couple of the treasure magazines. I think they - and the readers - would love them. The one's you wrote for us were fantastic, and I know all of our members who read them enjoyed them Yes

Joe

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10-27-2016, 02:55 PM
Post: #4
RE: Your Treasure Library
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Joe, I have both volumes of Karl Von Muller's books and they make you want to treasure hunt. He lived when metal detectors were simple TR's and Pluse machines. He did do plenty on developing a dredge for high area's above 5000 feet.

I recently purchased " How to Research for Treasure by Otto Von Helsing.
I must have a thing about authors names with Von as a middle name.
The book goes into good research tips. Now all I have to do is use them.

I really love treasure stories and in the past I purchased a few of Harry Glenn Carson's books but I need to look around for them I would love to re-read them again but don't know where they are hiding in my house.......

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10-29-2016, 05:26 PM
Post: #5
RE: Your Treasure Library
(This post was last modified: 10-29-2016 05:28 PM by Digsit.)
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I have just read what is on the Internet and the book that came in the package with my A T Pro , I think it was written by Charles Garrett  ( I think it was Treasure and Where to Find it , but I can't lay my hands on it and if I recall it was quite basic).The rest of my meager knowledge has come from lurking around these forums.
  It must have worked , I have made some fairly decent finds and even passed on what I know to a few others.
Pat

Ps I am intrigued by the Pasciucci book , I may have to look up a copy.....

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10-29-2016, 05:45 PM
Post: #6
RE: Your Treasure Library
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(10-27-2016 02:55 PM)Bigtony Wrote:  Joe, I have both volumes of Karl Von Muller's books and they make you want to treasure hunt. He lived when metal detectors were simple TR's and Pluse machines. He did do plenty on developing a dredge for high area's above 5000 feet.

I recently purchased " How to Research for Treasure by Otto Von Helsing.
I must have a thing about authors names with Von as a middle name.
The book goes into good research tips. Now all I have to do is use them.

I really love treasure stories and in the past I purchased a few of Harry Glenn Carson's books but I need to look around for them I would love to re-read them again but don't know where they are hiding in my house.......

Yeah, you seem to have an "Otto" fetish, Tony Chuckle In all seriousness...

Von Muller was an excellent writer on our hobby, and I find his stuff highly readable and entertaining. What specific books of his do you own?

I've never read Carson's stuff, but heard it's very good.

(10-29-2016 05:26 PM)Digsit Wrote:  I have just read what is on the Internet and the book that came in the package with my A T Pro , I think it was written by Charles Garrett  ( I think it was Treasure and Where to Find it , but I can't lay my hands on it and if I recall it was quite basic).The rest of my meager knowledge has come from lurking around these forums.
  It must have worked , I have made some fairly decent finds and even passed on what I know to a few others.
Pat

Ps I am intrigued by the Pasciucci book , I may have to look up a copy.....

Get the Pascucci book, Pat, you won't be disappointed. Surely, there's a lot in there you already know, but there are quite a few nuggets that are worth the price of the book alone.

One thing I hate, and Pascucci's book does NOT do this, it doesn't have a lot of "filler". That is, fluff about mindset in the field, types of detectors, etc. While those are important subjects, I want the meat & potato's, instead. It's a to-the-point, informative read, especially if you're a coin hunter and detect many harder hit places.

Joe

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10-29-2016, 10:42 PM
Post: #7
RE: Your Treasure Library
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Joe, I have two of KVM's Treasure Hunter's Manuals they are Volumes 6 and 7.
I agree they are interesting and fun to re-read from time to time. I picked them up in the early 90's. I bought them through Harry Nichols. A Whites dealer (at the time) for the entire east coast. He owned a store on route 46 east. He was a regular at club meetings. He would give a few minute talk almost every month on detecting stuff.

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10-30-2016, 07:56 AM
Post: #8
RE: Your Treasure Library
(This post was last modified: 10-30-2016 07:57 AM by NjNyDigger.)
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(10-29-2016 10:42 PM)Bigtony Wrote:  Joe, I have two of KVM's Treasure Hunter's Manuals they are Volumes 6 and 7.
I agree they are interesting and fun to re-read from time to time. I picked them up in the early 90's. I bought them through Harry Nichols. A Whites dealer (at the time) for the entire east coast. He owned a store on route 46 east. He was a regular at club meetings. He would give a few minute talk almost every month on detecting stuff.

I heard about that guy, but he was gone by the time I got into the hobby. From what I understand, there used to be a few dealers in the Northern NJ area, but the owners all passed away or closed up shop once the internet took storm. Sad. Meltzer's in Clifton used to have SOME detecting gear, but their detectors were only Whites, as I believe they were an exclusive dealer.

If you're ever in a pinch, there's a place called ZEPPELIN HOBBY in Wayne. They too only do Whites machines, but last I was there a few years ago, they also had scoops, pouches, tons of books and other goodies. But the detecting stuff is only a small portion of their overall business. If you enjoy slot cars, they have a HUGE track in the back, and people go in to race them. I actually got my first detector from them, a Whites MXT.

It is EXTREMELY difficult, for all but a few aggressive dealers who have been at it for many years or have large customer lists, to make a living from walk-in business alone. The advent of the internet killed the small, local, mom & pop dealers. As it did for the local hardware stores, butcher shops, etc. Tony, I know you can relate...

Growing up in an Italian household, what did our mothers do every Sunday, many years ago? They went to 3, 4 or 5 stores to buy all of the food for that day's feast; the produce market, the fish store, the butcher shop, etc. Doesn't really work that way anymore, save for rare occasions. Most of those businesses are long gone. A different era.

Growing up in Brooklyn, I vividly remember my dad, or my friends fathers or mothers asking me to run to the store to play their numbers, or to buy their smokes. I was maybe 12 or 13. Try doing THAT today. Everything is so P.C., it would never happen. But everyone knew everyone back then. Not like today, I don't even recognize most of my neighbors.

Joe

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10-30-2016, 02:13 PM
Post: #9
RE: Your Treasure Library
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Joe, I have been to Zepplin Hobbies in Wayne. If I remember correctly it is on 23 north
I went there a few times after Harry passed. I invited the owner (I forget his name) to come to the club and introduce himself. You are right it is a hobby shop, with Slot Cars and other items too.
If you go to local club hunts - even if you don't participate in the hunt - you will meet a few dealers that are friendly with that club. And I know some have web sites.

Yeah, the mom and pop places are gone and yes I can relate. One thing I can say is that the new owners are way different than previous owners.
Some new owners of bakeries or dinners either didn't get the recipe in the deal or feel theirs is better but whatever happened the food isn't even close.

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10-30-2016, 05:20 PM
Post: #10
RE: Your Treasure Library
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(10-30-2016 02:13 PM)Bigtony Wrote:  Joe, I have been to Zepplin Hobbies in Wayne. If I remember correctly it is on 23 north
I went there a few times after Harry passed. I invited the owner (I forget his name) to come to the club and introduce himself. You are right it is a hobby shop, with Slot Cars and other items too.
If you go to local club hunts - even if you don't participate in the hunt - you will meet a few dealers that are friendly with that club. And I know some have web sites.

Yeah, the mom and pop places are gone and yes I can relate. One thing I can say is that the new owners are way different than previous owners.
Some new owners of bakeries or dinners either didn't get the recipe in the deal or feel theirs is better but whatever happened the food isn't even close.

I believe the owner's name is Lou. Italian fella, I think. He doesn't detect, he's actually a bicycling enthusiast. Get this...

We were shooting the shit when I bought my detector, and he tells me he's in a bike club, and loves riding everywhere. He then tells me he frequently rides his bicycle from Wayne to NYC!!! I actually thought he was pulling my leg, but nope. And he must've been in his early to mid 60's at that point! That's a 40 or 50 mile round trip!

I'll stick to detecting Yes

Joe

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